Why the Renaissance makes me think things too much.

Michelangelo's David is the perfect example to everything that the Renaissance stood for. There are no images that can do justice to this sculpture. The details, the physique, the eyes. Everything about it evoques so many emotions in a human being. Shows us the importance of MEN, and the need to strive for perfection.
Michelangelo’s David is the perfect example to everything that the Renaissance stood for. There are no images that can do justice to this sculpture. The details, the physique, the eyes. Everything about it evoques so many emotions in a human being. Shows us the importance of MEN, and the need to strive for perfection.

The Renaissance has always been one of my favourite periods in history to study. It’s very name has a romantic flicker of hope, does it not? when I think about rebirth I immediately think of a Phoenix (I enjoy mythology a lot).

So, the Renaissance has always been to me the period of time in which human kind decided to go back to the good road. Not only in sciences, technology but in art as well.

Sandro Boticelli's
Sandro Boticelli’s “Primavera” has always been one of my favourite paintings by the artist. Makes me think of a party on a Greek forest, and that anything is possible. The use of tridimensional technique, the position of every figure shows the true master this man was.

I love, adore, enjoy the art of the Renaissance a little too much. The search for perfection that you find in each piece has always called my attention. When I look at a piece of art from this time (Be it a painting, building or sculpture)  I feel overwhelmed by how much human kind can do and by all the astonishing things we can create when we put our minds to it.

Bernardino Luigi's
Bernardino Luigi’s “The Virgin carrying the sleeping child with three angels”, reminds me that even if they were relying more on their brains, we can’t forget that the church was patron to many artists and religion has been important in human history. Still, this virgin looks more humane to me, while looking for perfection in the expression of his art.

A concept that always comes to mind when I think of this period is the term “Renaissance man”. This term refers to those men like Michelangelo or Da Vinci that had expertise in many areas of human knowledge. They were artists, engineers, architects, scholars. They had no limits. They wouldn’t accept those limits. In my very humble opinion, this limitless knowledge comes from the idea that man can do anything.

Bernini's design of St. Peter's Square in Rome is a great example of artistic architecture. it's not only functional, it's beautiful, leaves us in awe and it's geometrically perfect.
Bernini’s design of St. Peter’s Square in Rome is a great example of artistic architecture. it’s not only functional, it’s beautiful, leaves us in awe and it’s geometrically perfect.
Da Vinci's Vetrubian Man shows us -if we had any doubt-, the importance of man.
Da Vinci’s Vetrubian Man shows us -if we had any doubt-, the importance of man.

After searching for God, and leaving every decision and opinion to his mercy, human kind decides to look onto themselves. We realiced that humanity is able to do so much. We have the brains, we have the abilities, the tools. Why not use them in EVERY possible way? The result? Polymaths that created amazing pieces of work, to portray that human kind can do everything they set their minds to.

Could I leave a post on the Renaissance without at least showing at image of the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel. Some say this is Michelangelo's masterpiece. In my opinion, it's not his only masterpiece. his genius translated into so many of his pieces it's hard to pinpoint
Could I leave a post on the Renaissance without at least showing at image of the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel. Some say this is Michelangelo’s masterpiece. In my opinion, it’s not his only masterpiece. his genius translated into so many of his pieces it’s hard to pinpoint “THE masterpiece”
Raphael's Annunciation shows the perfect use of proportions, of foreshortening and chiaroscuro. I have always believed that if you want a true example of Renaissance painting, you should look at Raphael's work and you will understand it.
Raphael’s Annunciation shows the perfect use of proportions, of foreshortening and chiaroscuro. I have always believed that if you want a true example of Renaissance painting, you should look at Raphael’s work and you will understand it.

Can we go back to that mindset? Can we believe enough in ourselves to do that? Can we stop thinking selfishly and use our incredible abilities to create something amazing for everyone? Something that will transcend us?

Sometimes I think we can, and that we will. Sometimes I think that we should take some lessons from those Renaissance men, and try to be the best versions of ourselves we can be. I know perfection it’s hard to achieve (Fun fact, Rafael could actually trace a perfect circle), but can we consider at least going beyond our expectations?

See, there is always something new we can learn with history, and meditate with art.

Lots of Love

Dany.